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Welcome to NS3 DCE Quagga

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Introduction

The Quagga support on DCE enables the users to reuse routing protocol implementations of Quagga (RIPv1, RIPv2, RIPng, OSPFv2, OSPFv3, BGP, BGP+, RAadv) as models of network simulation. It reduces the time of re-implementation of the model, and potentially improve the result of the simulation since it already “actively running” in the real world.

It was started as a Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2008 by Liu Jian with numerous contributions especially on the netlink implementation with quagga porting into ns-3-simu (former name of ns-3-dce). You can look at his effort at the link.

Current Status (2012/4/23)

Quagga support on DCE does not fully support all the environment that DCE has. The following shows the limited availability of each protocol.

  Basic Mode (ns-3 stack) Advanced Mode (ns-3-linux) Remarks
Rtadvd (zebra) NG OK  
RIPv1/v2 (ripd) NG OK bind() fail
RIPng (ripngd) NG OK send() fail
OSPFv2 (ospfd) OK OK  
OSPFv3 (ospf6d) NG OK send() fail
BGP (bgpd) OK OK  
BGP+ (bgpd) NG OK  

Getting Started

Prerequisite

Quagga support on DCE requires several packages: autoconf, automake, flex, git-core, wget, g++, libc-dbg, bison, indent, pkgconfig, libssl-dev, libsysfs-dev, gawk

You need to install the correspondent packages in advance.

$ sudo apt-get install git-core (in ubuntu/debian)

or

$ sudo yum install git (in fedora)

Building ns-3, DCE, and DCE-Quagga

To install ns-3-dce-quagga, you can use bake as an installation tool as follows.

$ hg clone http://code.nsnam.org/bake bake
$ export BAKE_HOME=`pwd`/bake
$ export PATH=$PATH:$BAKE_HOME
$ export PYTHONPATH=$PYTHONPATH:$BAKE_HOME

then build ns-3-dce with quagga:

mkdir dce
cd dce
bake.py configure -e dce-ns3-|version| -e dce-quagga-|version|
bake.py download
bake.py build

note that dce-quagga-1.7 is the DCE quagga module version 1.7. If you would like to use the development version of the module, you can specify dce-quagga-dev as a module name for bake.

If you want to use dce-quagga with DCE advanced mode (i.e., using Linux native network stack), you can build as following commands. This is highly recommended at this moment (2012/04/20) so that Quagga runs successfully.

mkdir dce
cd dce
bake.py configure -e dce-linux-|version| -e dce-quagga-|version|
bake.py download
bake.py build

For more information about ns-3-dce core, please refer the DCE manual.

Then you can try an example of ns-3-dce-quagga as follows:

$ cd source/ns-3-dce
$ ./test.py -s dce-quagga
...
PASS: TestSuite dce-quagga 9.775 s
1 of 1 tests passed (1 passed, 0 skipped, 0 failed, 0 crashed, 0 valgrind errors)

You can see the above PASSed test if everything goes fine. Congrats!

Examples

Basic

$ cd source/ns-3-dce
$ ./waf --run dce-zebra-simple

if everything goes fine, you would see the file “routes.log” in the current directory as follows. The routes “10.1.0.0/24” and “10.2.0.0/24” was announced by ospfd accordingly.

Time: 70s
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
127.0.0.0       0.0.0.0         255.0.0.0       U     0      -      -   0
10.1.1.0        0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U     0      -      -   1
10.2.1.0        0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U     0      -      -   2
10.1.0.0        10.2.1.1        255.255.255.0   UGS   20     -      -   2
10.2.0.0        10.1.1.1        255.255.255.0   UGS   20     -      -   1

OSPF

Another example of OSPF is generating pcap file.

$ cd source/ns-3-dce
$ ./waf --run dce-quagga-ospfd

You would see the following parsed output by tcpdump.

$ tcpdump -r dce-quagga-ospfd-0-0.pcap -n -vvv
 :
 (snip)
09:00:45.106325 IP (tos 0x0, ttl 1, id 0, offset 0, flags [none], proto OSPF (89), length 72, bad cksum 0 (->a55b)!)
    10.0.0.2 > 10.0.0.1: OSPFv2, Database Description, length 52
        Router-ID 10.0.0.2, Backbone Area, Authentication Type: none (0)
        Options [External], DD Flags [Master], MTU: 65535, Sequence: 0x4b3d3b2e
          Advertising Router 10.0.0.2, seq 0x80000002, age 0s, length 16
            Router LSA (1), LSA-ID: 10.0.0.2
            Options: [External]

OSPF with ns-3-linux

The final example of OSPF is using Linux kernel stack via DCE.

$ cd source/ns-3-dce
$ ./waf --run "dce-quagga-ospfd --netStack=linux"

then, you would see the following parsed output by tcpdump.

$ tcpdump -r dce-quagga-ospfd-0-0.pcap -n -vvv
 :
 (snip)
09:00:45.106325 IP (tos 0xc0, ttl 1, id 15116, offset 0, flags [none], proto OSPF (89), length 72)
    10.0.0.2 > 10.0.0.1: OSPFv2, Database Description, length 52
        Router-ID 10.0.0.2, Backbone Area, Authentication Type: none (0)
        Options [External], DD Flags [Master], MTU: 1500, Sequence: 0x4b3d3b2e
          Advertising Router 10.0.0.2, seq 0x80000002, age 0s, length 16
            Router LSA (1), LSA-ID: 10.0.0.2
            Options: [External]

Configuration Manual

In order to utilize quagga protocols in ns-3, users need to define in the scenario via ns3::QuaggaHelper.

#include "ns3/quagga-helper.h"

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
  QuaggaHelper quagga;
  quagga.EnableOspf (node, "10.0.0.0/8");
  quagga.EnableOspfDebug (node);
  quagga.EnableZebraDebug (node);
  quagga.Install (node);
}

Modifying DCE Quagga

Customizing Helper

At this moment, only a limited configuration of Quagga is implemented in the QuaggaHelper. For example, if you wanna configure the “cost” parameter of OSPF link, you do have to extend QuaggaHelper (quagga-helper.cc) to generate the following configuration for example.

interface sim0
  ip ospf cost 20
!

Customizing Binary

If you wanna extend the protocol by modifying the source code of Quagga, your extended binary should be located at the directory “ns-3-dce/build/bin_dce”.

FAQ

(TBA)